RIFT Military Occupational Specialties

Members of RIFT 1, 9th Regiment as of August, 2179. From left to right: RIFT Lance Corporal William Hudson (1221 Technical Systems Specialist), RIFT Trooper First Class Tip Crowe (1229 Ground Vehicles Mechanic), RIFT Trooper First Class Trevor Wierzbowski (1271 Combat Engineer), RIFT Private First Class Jenette Vasquez (1231 Heavy Weapons Operator), RIFT Corporal Cynthia Dietrich (1274 Medic), RIFT Corporal Dwayne Hicks (1261 Fire Support Specialist), RIFT Private First Class Mark Drake (1231 Heavy Weapons Operator), RIFT Lance Corporal Ricco Frost (1281 Ground Weapon Systems Specialist), RIFT Lance Corporal Daniel “Badger” Spunkmeyer (1224 D-4 Crew Chief), Lieutenant Commander Scott Gorman (1270 RIFT Platoon Commander), RIFT Lance Sergeant Colette “Magnet” Ferro (1206 D-4 Pilot), RIFT Command Sergeant Al Apone (1212 Meteorological/Oceanographic Specialist).

A defining feature of Reconnaissance In Force Teams is their ability to operate mostly independently from other units. While a conventional Marine unit requires a number of various support and service personnel to be attached to the unit, RIFT members provide all of the needed specialist support themselves largely without the need for additional support personnel. This means that RIFTs can always be expected to consist of a large number of members with extensive training in various skills and services both on and off the battlefield, ranging from D-4 dropship pilot to ground vehicle mechanic, and from fire support specialist to weapons specialists. These specialists are each given a Military Occupational Specialty code and name that reflects their training and duties as RIFT members.

Like all other USCM Military Occupational Specialties, RIFT MOSs are given a four-digit identifying code and are further broken down into primary and secondary MOSs. All primary RIFT MOSs begin with 12, while all secondary MOSs are in the 24XX category. Additionally, RIFT instructors are given an MOS of their own based on the type of MOS course they teach; these are numbered in the 36XX category.

All RIFT members hold a single primary MOS, and secondary MOSs are assigned based on the requirements of their position within the team and on an individual’s desire to learn. For example, the 2417 RIFT Sniper secondary MOS is required to be held by Marines who are paired with their team’s 1231 Heavy Weapons Operators regardless of what their primary MOS is, but Marines in other positions who are not required to be trained this MOS can still learn it if they so desire. There is no minimum number of secondary MOSs for RIFT personnel to hold, meaning that a given RIFT member might not have any secondary MOSs at all. Conversely, there is no upper limit to the number of secondary MOSs a single member can hold, and incentive to learn these skills is incentivized by additional pay being given for each secondary MOS a Marine is qualified for.

Secondary Military Occupational Specialties for RIFT teams are primarily based on filling minor support roles and often build on common training provided during primary MOS training courses. For example, all RIFT personnel are taught basic camouflage and concealment techniques as well as the operation of the M42-series sniper rifles, but only Marines with the 2417 RIFT Sniper MOS are taught specifically how to apply this knowledge and more advanced training in a way that makes for an effective sniper.

Secondary MOSs also exist to allow personnel to receive necessary training while actively serving in a RIFT. This cuts down on the required training time for their primary MOS and also offers more flexibility so that MOSs can be earned based on positional requirements. Training for secondary MOSs is ordinarily done “in-house” by a combination of computer/textbook-based training and hands-on application, which can be taught by another RIFT member who holds the same MOS and has a rank of at least RIFT Corporal. For example, RIFT members Colette Ferro and Daniel Spunkmeyer were required to hold the 2432 Lift Equipment Operator Level 2 MOS to perform their duties as their team’s dropship crew, but instead of this training being provided in RIFT Flight and Aircraft School, they were assigned to RIFT 1 of the 9th Regiment and taught the relevant material and hands-on application by RIFT Staff Sergeant Apone, their team’s leader, who already had the 2432 MOS.

Primary RIFT Military Occupational Specialties

1206 D-4 Pilot:

The 1206 D-4 Pilot MOS is assigned to graduates of the RIFT Flight and Aircraft School training course who demonstrate exceptional skills in all areas of training, particularly all aspects of the operational use of D-4 dropships and especially the MD-4L variant of the series. This MOS and the 1224 D-4 Crew Chief MOS are unique among RIFT MOSs in that they are taught in the same training course and graduates are assigned one of the two MOSs based on a combination of their performance and preference. Training for this MOS takes sixteen months.

The 1206 D-4 Pilot MOS is considerably more difficult to achieve than the 1224 D-4 Crew Chief MOS; while RIFT Flight and Aircraft School training flights have an average attrition rate of eighty percent, only half of trainees who graduate will qualify for the 1206 MOS, meaning that ninety percent of a given training flight can be expected not to qualify for this MOS. Part of the reason for this increased difficulty is that the 1206 MOS requires proficiency in the duties assigned to both a D-4-series pilot and crew chief, while the 1224 MOS only requires proficiency in the D-4 crew chief position; the remaining half of graduates who do not receive the 1206 MOS will be given the 1224 MOS instead. On rare occasions, graduates who are eligible for the 1206 MOS will opt to take the lower 1224 MOS instead to increase their chances of being assigned to a RIFT alongside their training partner if said partner also qualified for the 1206 MOS. Uniquely, a Marine who only qualifies for the 1224 MOS can take a knowledge- and performance-based test after one year of field experience to attempt to move up to the 1206 MOS; this is possible due to the fact that the two MOSs are so similar in training and in field duties and are largely awarded based on skill levels.

The 1206 MOS and its counterpart the 1224 MOS are considered the easiest to qualify for in terms of trainees’ physical abilities but the most difficult (apart from the 1221 Technical Systems Specialist MOS) to qualify for in terms of education. This is because of how much technical information trainees are expected to learn: airframe inspection and maintenance, powerplant inspection and maintenance, avionics inspection and repair, aviation ordnance, and other topics related to the maintenance and operational use of the D-4 dropship series, as well as the flight-related classes, which span from actually flying such a craft, electronic warfare, navigation and radar, procedures for deploying from and returning to a parent spaceship, and other relevant subjects. In addition, the 1206 MOS requires significant knowledge of the operation of the Susquehanna-class ships used by Reconnaissance In Force Teams, as holders of this MOS are expected to take their ship’s pilot position during times when the ship is under manual control.

Apart from the 1267 Stryker 2 Commander MOS, the 1206 D-4 Pilot MOS is the only RIFT MOS that guarantees a rank of at least RIFT Lance Corporal on graduation of training. Due to the responsibilities of the position and the abilities a trainee must display to qualify for the 1206 MOS, the rank of RIFT Private First Class is considered too low for the position and all RIFT Privates who graduate training with this MOS bypass the rank of RIFT PFC entirely. Exceptional trainees will sometimes be granted the next rank up, RIFT Corporal. Because the responsibilities of this MOS make Marine personnel who hold it unsuitable for command of a RIFT team, it is considered a “rank-restricted” MOS and the highest rank a holder of this MOS can hope to achieve without changing to a different MOS or going through RIFT Platoon Commander School is RIFT Lance Sergeant.

Notable Marine personnel with this MOS:

RIFT Lance Sergeant Colette Ferro (callsign “Magnet”)

RIFT Corporal Skye Larkins (callsign “Skylark”)

RIFT Corporal Sydell (callsign “Lonesome”)

1212 Meteorological/Oceanographic Specialist:

The 1212 Meteorological/Oceanographic Specialist MOS is a combination of several non-RIFT MOSs all taught in a single training course to produce individual Marines who are capable of single-handedly performing a wide variety of tasks that would normally take multiple personnel to achieve. Initially, this MOS was given its name because the training was primarily concerned with reconnaissance-related weather and oceanographic observations, but after several years all RIFT training programs were updated to include basic education in this field and the 1212 MOS was specialized by adding training in additional fields not strictly related to weather or oceanography, although the MOS name remained unchanged. Training for this MOS takes fourteen months.

In addition to advanced meteorological and oceanographic studies, the 1212 MOS specializes in a variety of duties related to the collection and relay of accurate data on foreign terrain, including geodetic, topographic, and hydrographic survey operations and their relation to military intelligence. An important part of this duty is the construction and/or revision of military maps or charts with relevant data; therefore, a Marine with this MOS can be considered both their team’s “weatherman” and “mapmaker”.

Despite the importance of this MOS to reconnaissance duties, it is important to note that it is considered a “non-critical” RIFT MOS in that it is not essential for the proper functioning of a Reconnaissance In Force Team. This is largely due to the expansion of RIFT unit duties beyond simple reconnaissance and covert operations into a wide number of other operational duties. The 1212 MOS is one of four “non-critical” RIFT MOSs, the other three being the 1261 Fire Support Specialist, the 1271 Combat Engineer, and the 1292 Vent Infiltration Specialist. Because there are eight MOSs (covering nine personnel) that are considered “critical” to a RIFT being operational, the remaining three personnel can be expected to have any combination of three of these four MOSs. The types of missions a given RIFT can be assigned will often depend on which of these personnel skillsets are available to it, although it should be noted that the 1292 Vent Infiltration Specialist MOS is fairly uncommon and the majority of RIFTs consist of a combination of the 1212, 1261, and 1271 MOSs for their three “non-critical” positions.

The 1212 MOS is not considered a “rank-restricted” position and holders of this MOS can achieve any rank up to and including RIFT Command Sergeant.

Notable Marine personnel with this MOS:

RIFT Command Sergeant Al Apone

RIFT Command Sergeant Anne Sloan

1221 Technical Systems Specialist:

1221 Technical Systems Specialists are considered the “general technicians” of RIFT units and receive extensive training in the operation and maintenance of many different technical and electronic systems. Marine William Hudson, a holder of the 1221 MOS, once explained the expansive nature of his duties by pointing out that he was trained to do everything from fixing a slow laptop to performing maintenance and repairs on the computer systems of the Susquehanna-class ships used by Reconnaissance In Force Teams. As such, this MOS is considered the most difficult to achieve due to the amount of technical information that trainees must learn and memorize and the high level of technical skill they must display. The 1221 MOS is so difficult to achieve, with an average training attrition rate of over ninety-three percent, that it is the only MOS to have training squads of thirty personnel rather than only twenty; and typically only two members of any given training squad are expected to graduate. This means that the 1221 MOS has the highest attrition rate and produces the lowest ratio of graduates to candidates of all RIFT MOSs except for the 1292 Vent Infiltration Specialist MOS. Training for this position takes twenty months, making it the longest RIFT training program apart from RIFT Platoon Commander School.

Holders of this MOS have a wide variety of duties both on and off the battlefield, including communications, signal intelligence, ground electronic warfare, electronics repair, data retrieval (“hacking”), and cyberspace operations. It is one of eight MOSs that are considered critical to the operational status of Reconnaissance In Force Teams and every RIFT can be expected to have a member with this MOS. It is not considered a “rank-restricted” position and holders of this MOS can achieve any rank up to and including RIFT Command Sergeant.

Notable Marine personnel with this MOS:

RIFT Lance Corporal William Hudson

1224 D-4 Crew Chief:

1224 D-4 Crew Chiefs fill an important role in the operational status of all RIFT units. They serve in the copilot position of a team’s MD-4L dropship alongside the pilot, who holds the 1206 D-4 Pilot MOS. Training for the 1224 MOS is conducted parallel with the 1206 MOS and the two positions are awarded on graduation based on trainee performance and skill level. The primary differentiator between whether a Marine is given the 1206 or 1224 MOS depends on the skill level they display at actually flying the D-4 dropship series, which is considered the most difficult part of D-4 operation. Trainees who excel in all areas of RIFT Flight and Aircraft School training will receive the 1206 MOS, while trainees who are less capable of directly flying the craft but are still highly competent are given the 1224 MOS. This does not mean that Marines with this MOS are incapable of flying the craft, simply that their performance in that particularly field of training did not meet the higher requirements placed on graduates with the 1206 MOS. More specifically, trainees are each graded on their performance in all of the general or specific subjects taught in RIFT Flight and Aircraft School training, and while a passing grade for the 1224 MOS requires an individual trainee to receive a grade of at least eighty percent for all subjects including operational flight, a passing grade for the 1206 MOS requires a trainee to receive a grade of at least eighty percent for all subjects except for operational flight, which requires a ninety percent grade or higher. As with the 1206 MOS, training for this MOS takes sixteen months.

Due to the nature of this MOS and its relation to a RIFT’s command structure, it is a “rank-restricted” MOS and holders will not be promoted beyond the rank of RIFT Lance Corporal.

Notable Marine personnel with this MOS:

RIFT Lance Corporal Daniel Spunkmeyer (callsign “Badger”)

RIFT Private First Class Hanstad

RIFT Private First Class Kimberly Mathis

1229 Ground Vehicles Mechanic:

Marines with the 1229 Ground Vehicles Mechanic MOS are responsible for the care of all ground vehicles in their RIFT’s inventory and as such, all Reconnaissance In Force Teams can be expected to have a member with this MOS. Training for the 1229 MOS takes fourteen months.

Training for the 1229 MOS involves educating recruits in the inspection, maintenance, and repair of all the ground vehicles that are assigned to their RIFT, from the M1338 snowmobile and P5000 powerloader to the M9005 Blazer light truck and M577 Stryker 2 APC. This training is largely related to the mechanical side of care for these vehicles, while maintenance of onboard computer systems for all vehicles is also partly the responsibility of the unit’s 1221 Technical Systems Specialist.

The 1229 MOS is not considered a “rank-restricted” position and holders of this MOS can achieve any rank up to and including RIFT Command Sergeant.

Notable Marine personnel with this MOS:

RIFT Trooper First Class Tip Crowe (unofficial MOS; he actually held the UKCM equivalent)

RIFT Corporal Micah Collins

1231 Heavy Weapons Operator:

The 1231 Heavy Weapons Operator MOS is unique in that it is the only MOS that is required to be held by two Marines in a single Reconnaissance In Force Unit. As the name indicates, this MOS primarily focuses on the operation of various man-portable heavy weapon systems like the M45/M56 Smartgun family, M240 flamethrower, and FGM-232 Saber anti-tank missile launcher. Training for this MOS takes fourteen months.

The 1231 MOS is similar to the 1281 Ground Weapon Systems Specialist MOS in terms of training, but the 1231 MOS is more concerned with the operational deployment of heavy weapon systems while the 1281 MOS focuses primarily on the maintenance of such systems as well as the use and operation of the M577 Stryker 2 APC. However, the two are similar enough that Marines with the 1231 MOS will often assist the Ground Weapon Systems Specialist in their team with weapon maintenance and Marines with the 1281 MOS can assist their unit’s Heavy Weapons Operators with their duties in the field in some cases.

Due to the responsibilities of this MOS in the field, it is a “rank-restricted” MOS and Marines who hold it cannot be promoted beyond the rank of RIFT Lance Corporal.

Notable Marine personnel with this MOS:

RIFT Private First Class Mark Drake

RIFT Private First Class Jenette Vasquez

1261 Fire Support Specialist:

1261 Fire Support Specialist is the MOS given to RIFT personnel who specialize in observing and directing the use of air and artillery support during ground operations. Training takes fourteen months.

Although the 1261 MOS is technically a “non-critical” MOS, its usefulness makes it fairly common among RIFTs. Marines with this MOS are specially trained in the observation of enemy forces, the selection of targets, and the direction and observation of artillery fire and air support against such targets. Although all RIFT members are given special training in general reconnaissance, the training involved in the 1261 MOS training program makes Marines with this MOS particularly adept at reconnaissance even just for reporting purposes, not necessarily for the immediate use of supporting fire to engage the enemy.

The 1261 MOS is not considered a “rank-restricted” position and holders of this MOS can achieve any rank up to and including RIFT Command Sergeant.

Notable Marine personnel with this MOS:

RIFT Corporal Dwayne Hicks

1267 Stryker 2 Commander:

The 1267 Stryker 2 Commander MOS is used specifically for enlisted personnel who act as commanders for RIFT M577 Stryker 2 APCs. Marines with this MOS are found exclusively in the second RIFT of all RIFT platoons, as the equivalent position in the first RIFT of a platoon is held by an officer with the 1270 RIFT Platoon Commander MOS. Training for this position takes sixteen months.

Outside of commanding the vehicle itself, Marines with this MOS have minimal command authority and their primary duties involve using their APC’s onboard computer systems, the Future Battlefield Network that all Marine helmet computers are linked to, and various other sensor and data/intelligence reporting systems to maintain situational awareness in the field and pass critical information to the infantry components of their RIFT. Unlike officers with the 1270 MOS who make the majority of command decisions immediately from their station in the unit APC based on the information available to them, enlisted Marines with the 1267 MOS are expected to pass on information to their team sergeant or other command personnel for them to make tactical decisions.

Apart from the 1206 D-4 Pilot MOS, the 1267 Stryker 2 Commander MOS is the only RIFT MOS that guarantees a rank of at least RIFT Lance Corporal on graduation of training. Due to the responsibilities of the position and the abilities a trainee must display to qualify for the 1267 MOS, the rank of RIFT Private First Class is considered too low for the position and all RIFT Privates who graduate training with this MOS bypass the rank of RIFT PFC entirely. Exceptional trainees will sometimes be granted the next rank up, RIFT Corporal. Because the responsibilities of this MOS make Marine personnel who hold it unsuitable for command of a RIFT team, it is considered a “rank-restricted” MOS and the highest rank a holder of this MOS can hope to achieve without changing to a different MOS or going through RIFT Platoon Commander School is RIFT Lance Sergeant.

Notable Marine personnel with this MOS:

RIFT Corporal Reverdin

1270 RIFT Platoon Commander:

The 1270 RIFT Platoon Commander is the only MOS available for RIFT officers. Each RIFT platoon is commanded by a single officer who also serves as the commander of the first RIFT’s APC. This means that the 1270 MOS is very similar to the 1267 Stryker 2 Commander MOS but with the additional responsibilities of being the highest-ranking member not only of the team but also of the entire platoon. While Marines with the 1267 MOS are primarily concerned with monitoring on-going operations and tactical information and passing details to the commanders of their unit’s fireteams for them to make decisions, officers with the 1270 MOS make all of these decisions themselves immediately based on the information available to them. Although it is common for the RIFTs of a platoon to work separately from each other, RIFT officers must be prepared to command both teams at once during joint operations. Because of the significant amount of responsibility and the high level of leadership capabilities expected of Marines with this MOS as well as the amount of information relevant to being in command of a RIFT both on and off the battlefield, training for this MOS takes twenty-four months, making it the longest RIFT training course.

Because Officer Training School is the USCM’s primary source of commissioned officers, the typical track for a Marine to become a RIFT officer is to enlist, go through basic training, be accepted into and graduate from Officer Training School, and be accepted into and graduate from RIFT Platoon Commander School. However, there are two alternative paths for an enlisted member of the Marines to become a RIFT officer; both paths require that the Marine already be a trained, experienced RIFT member. In the first, a RIFT member can take a shorter, eight-month training course to receive their officer’s commission, and in the second, which is extremely rare, senior enlisted RIFT members can be given a commission for displaying exceptional battlefield merit.

Much like enlisted personnel, RIFT officers are ranked on a separate track from standard Marine personnel. Trainees in RIFT Platoon Commander School are given the rank of RIFT Lieutenant, which is technically considered an O2 paygrade but much like RIFT Private, which technically has a paygrade of E3 but has no authority, this rank gives its bearer no command authority as it is considered a training rank. Marines who graduate RIFT Platoon Commander School are automatically promoted to the rank of RIFT Lieutenant Commander, paygrade O3. After ten to twelve years of service, RIFT Lieutenant Commanders are promoted to RIFT Commander or removed from their position if they are considered undeserving of this higher rank.

Notable Marine personnel with this MOS:

RIFT Commander Corinne Viano

RIFT Commander Berkley

RIFT Lieutenant Commander Scott Gorman

1271 Combat Engineer:

1271 Combat Engineers are one of the four “non-critical” roles in Reconnaissance In Force Teams, although their usefulness in combat means that Marines with this MOS are fairly common. Their duties involve all aspects of engineering relevant to the battlefield, and training for this MOS takes sixteen months.

1271 Combat Engineers are responsible for various engineering-related duties in action, including demolitions, assessment of a building or target’s structural stability, operation of armored construction vehicles such as bulldozers and earthmovers under fire, and assessment of the ability of available technology to overcome terrain obstacles. As an example of this last duty, a 1271 Combat Engineer deployed in a RIFT performing reconnaissance duties ahead of a larger force might have to make an assessment of a pre-existing bridge across a river to determine if it is strong enough to hold the weight of friendly vehicles, or if it is not, if the banks of the river are suitable for the deployment or construction of a portable bridge. Conversely, a Marine with this MOS might be required to make an assessment of such a structure to determine what level of force would be required to destroy it either by demolition or by air or artillery fire.

The 1271 MOS is not considered a “rank-restricted” position and holders of this MOS can achieve any rank up to and including RIFT Command Sergeant.

Notable Marine personnel with this MOS:

RIFT Trooper First Class Trevor Wierzbowski (unofficial MOS; he actually held the UKCM equivalent)

RIFT Lance Corporal Garnet Towers

1274 Medic:

The 1274 Medic MOS is one of the eight “critical” MOSs to a RIFT’s operational capabilities. RIFT Medics receive more in-depth training than conventional medics to fit their expanded responsibilities due to the independent nature of RIFT operations, although they remain subordinate to the direction of qualified doctors and specialists while not in the field and they cannot provide specialized services to the members of their team. RIFT Medics are primarily focused on tending to wounded personnel and civilians in the field and on maintaining the general health of their team members when not in the field; their knowledge combined with their proximity to their teammates makes them important in accurately reporting medical information to the appropriate specialists if a health issue arises, while a RIFT member with an active condition or who is recovering from an injury will typically be monitored on a day-to-day basis by their team medic to ensure they are following the specialist-prescribed treatment regimen. This MOS takes sixteen months of training.

The 1274 MOS is considered a “semi-rank-restricted” position, and while a Marine with this MOS can potentially be promoted as high as RIFT Command Sergeant, this is uncommon and promotion for most holders of this MOS stops at RIFT Corporal or even RIFT Lance Corporal.

Notable Marine personnel with this MOS:

RIFT Corporal Cynthia Dietrich

RIFT Private First Class Stein

1281 Ground Weapon Systems Specialist:

The 1281 Ground Weapon Systems Specialist in a Reconnaissance In Force Team is responsible for the care of all the unit’s small arms as well as the operation and maintenance of heavy weapon systems such as the M577 Stryker 2 APC’s onboard weapons. Marines with this MOS also typically serve as highly-trained drivers for the M577 APC; although all RIFT MOSs include training in the operation of the M577, the 1281 MOS training program is much more in-depth in this field.

The 1281 MOS is similar to the 1231 Heavy Weapons Operator MOS in terms of training, but the 1231 MOS is more concerned with the operational deployment of heavy weapon systems while the 1281 MOS focuses primarily on the maintenance of such systems as well as the use and operation of the M577 APC. However, the two are similar enough that Marines with the 1231 MOS will often assist the Ground Weapon Systems Specialist in their team with weapon maintenance, and Marines with the 1281 MOS can assist their unit’s Heavy Weapons Operators with their duties in the field in some cases.

Due to the nature of this MOS and its relation to a RIFT’s command structure, it is a “rank-restricted” MOS and holders will not be promoted beyond the rank of RIFT Lance Corporal.

Notable Marine personnel with this MOS:

RIFT Lance Corporal Ricco Frost

1292 Vent Infiltration Specialist:

The 1292 Vent Infiltration Specialist MOS is one of the least-common RIFT MOSs. Marines with this MOS fill a highly-specialized role and are responsible for infiltrating ventilation systems and access tunnels on spaceships, space stations, and even buildings to conduct reconnaissance, sabotage, recovery of data and intelligence, and other duties. Training for this MOS is highly selective, and while the attrition rate is at ninety-five percent, the highest of all RIFT MOSs, 1292 training squads are not composed of thirty trainees like the similarly-difficult 1221 MOS training squads because of how few candidates can even qualify for the training program in the first place. Instead, 1292 training squads are composed of twenty trainees like other RIFT MOSs, but the attrition rate of ninety-five percent means that typically only one trainee from a squad will graduate. Training for this position takes fourteen months.

Marines with the 1292 MOS are trained in stealth above all else. The vast majority of operations requiring their skills also require moving and working in near to complete silence. Because of this, many Marines with this MOS will wear different clothing and minimize the amount of equipment they carry to prevent objects from rattling or coming into contact with objects in the environment they are navigating. This extends so far that some “Vent Rats” will only carry an M24 handgun with suppressor for protection, and anything that cannot be tied or taped down or put in a pocket or thick pouch will be discarded. Even equipment like night-vision goggles is typically provided with fabric covers to minimize noise production from contact with hard surfaces, and Vent Infiltration Specialists are issued with special leather moccasins to wear while crawling through vents to prevent their heavy boots from making undesirable noise. Vent Rats will typically wear their boots and carry their moccasins to the point of infiltration and then remove their boots and put on the moccasins.

The requirements of this MOS mean that in addition to actually infiltrating and moving through ventilation and access systems, training also emphasizes computer infiltration (“hacking”) for data retrieval, sabotage of electronic and mechanical systems, and demolitions. Trainees must also demonstrate excellent memory skills in order to memorize complex networks of ductwork or tunnels, particularly as these areas are often too dark to read a map and artificial light sources are unsafe to use.

The extremely high attrition rate in training and the amount of effort that goes into training just one Marine to qualify for this MOS has caused controversy among the Marines and debate over whether or not the services provided by Vent Infiltration Specialists justify the expense and personnel of the training program and even over whether or not this MOS is even necessary at all. However, supporters point out that even trainees who fail this course and return to more conventional assignments have put what training they did receive to good use on several occasions and also cite a number of prominent missions where vital information was recovered or important objectives were fulfilled by Vent Infiltration Specialists in situations where there was no other alternative.

Like the 1274 Medic MOS, the 1292 MOS is considered a “semi-rank-restricted” position, and while a Vent Infiltration Specialist can potentially be promoted as high as RIFT Command Sergeant, this is uncommon and promotion for most stops at RIFT Corporal or even RIFT Lance Corporal.

Notable Marine personnel with this MOS:

RIFT Lieutenant Commander Scott Gorman (former)

Secondary RIFT Military Occupational Specialties

Further details to follow.

2416 Metalworker

2417 RIFT Sniper

2431 Lift Equipment Operator Level 1

2432 Lift Equipment Operator Level 2

2436 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Assistant

2443 Supply Chain Management

2451 Interrogator

2469 Utilities Maintenance Specialist

2474 Medical Assistant

2481 Orbital Landing Support Specialist

Training

3612 RIFT Meteorological/Oceanographic Instructor

3621 RIFT Technical Systems Instructor

3629 RIFT Ground Vehicles Mechanics Instructor

3631 RIFT Heavy Weapons Instructor

3654 RIFT Flight and Aircraft School Instructor

3661 RIFT Fire Support Specialist Instructor

3667 RIFT Stryker 2 Commander Instructor

3670 RIFT Platoon Commander Instructor

3671 RIFT Combat Engineer Instructor

3674 RIFT Medic Instructor

3681 RIFT Ground Weapon Systems Instructor

3692 RIFT Vent Infiltration Instructor

%d bloggers like this: