M322 Shotgun

The M322 shotgun with the stock fully extended and a ten-round box magazine.

The M322 is the standard shotgun of the United States Colonial Marines. It is an improved variant of the USAS-12 automatic shotgun.

Weapon Designation:Shotgun, 12-Gauge, Automatic, M322
Type:Automatic Shotgun
Place of Origin:United States
In Service:2043-present
Production History:
Designed:2043
Manufacturer:Armat Battlefield Systems
Produced:2043-present
Specifications:
Weight:9.66 lb (4.38 kg)
Length:37.5 in (952.5 mm)
Barrel Length:18 in (457.2 mm)
Cartridge:12-gauge
Action:Gas-operated
Rate of Fire:300 rounds/minute
Muzzle Velocity:1,300 ft/s (400 m/s)
Effective Range:50 m (55 yd)
Feed System:10-round box magazine, 20-round drum magazine
Sights:Iron sights

Background:

By 2042, the United States military had still yet to select a single standardized automatic shotgun design, despite having come to acknowledge the need for such a weapon in recent years. The Next Generation Automatic Shotgun (NGAS) program was announced in August, 2042. Several companies responded, including Colt with the MCS-12 and Heckler and Koch with the ICAWS, but ultimately the competition was won by Armat Battlefield System’s UAS, or Universal Assault Shotgun, an improved version of the Daewoo Precision Industries USAS-12. It was adopted as the M322 in early 2043.

Design:

The M322 changed very little from the basic USAS-12. The most notable change is the use of polymers in the weapon’s construction, cutting 1.07 kg of weight from the weapon. An ammunition counter display has been added to the rear of the carry handle, and the fixed stock is replaced with an M4-type collapsible stock, while a laser aiming module has been added to the bottom of the front sight post, controlled by either an on-off button on the laser module itself, or a pressure switch on the front of the pistol grip, activated by squeezing firmly with the middle finger. A second switch on the laser module can disable the pressure switch to prevent unintentional use by a nervous operator.

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